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Health Benefits Of Soybeans

Health benefits of soybeans

Soybeans are legumes native to Eastern Asia. They have been consumed for thousands of years, as they contain nutrients that have been linked to various health effects, such as bone health.

Key takeaways: 

1. Soybeans are among the best sources of plant-based protein, with 16.6g per 100g portion.

2. Its consumption may reduce the risk of osteoporosis, a disease caused by a reduction in bone density and increased risk of fractures.

3. They may also reduce depressive symptoms and boost memory and cognition.

 

Nutritional content 

Soybeans are among the best sources of plant-based protein, but they also contain good amounts of carbs and fat. In fact, a 100g portion contains 16.6g of protein, 173 calories and 9g of fat (mainly monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats, ie., the good fats). Soybeans are also a good source of various minerals and vitamins, including vitamin K1, folate, copper, manganese, phosphorus and thiamine. These are important for red blood cell production, heart rate and blood pressure regulation and immune system activation. Finally, they are also rich in bioactive plant compounds such as isoflavones (antioxidant), phytic acid and saponins.

 

Health benefits 

Studies have investigated the role of soy for a number of health benefits. Researchers found that the consumption of soy products may reduce the risk of osteoporosis, a disease characterised by a reduction in bone density and increased risk of fractures. What’s more, other studies found that soybeans may have a positive effect on depression symptoms and stress, thanks to the isoflavone content. Finally, their consumption may also benefit our memory and cognition. In fact, studies found that the isoflavone in soybeans may be responsible for improving short- and long-term memory, as well as our cognitive function.

 

WORK CITED: 

File S., Jarrett N., Fluck E. et al. (2001). Eating soya improves human memory. Psychopharmacology, 157(4), pp.430-436.

Henderson V., St John J. Hodis H. et al. (2012). Long-term soy isoflavone supplementation and cognition in women: a randomized, controlled trial. Neurology, 78(23), pp.1841-1848.

Cheng P., Chen J., Zhou X. et al. (2015). Do soy isoflavones improve cognitive function in postmenopausal women? A meta-analysis. Menopause, 22(2), pp.198-206.

Messina M. and Gleason C. (2016). Evaluation of the Potential antidepressant effects of soybean isoflavones. Menopause, 23(12), pp.1348-1360.

Potter S., Baum J., Teng H. et al. (1998). Soy protein and isoflavones: their effects on blood lipids and bone density in postmenopausal women. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 68(6), pp.1375S-1379S.

Taku K., Melby M., Nishi N. et al. (2011). Soy isoflavones for osteoporosis: an evidence-based approach. Maturitas, 70(4), pp.333-338.

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